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Kit Siang's 'green wave' meant to scare non-Malays, says Azmin

The Selangor Perikatan Nasional chairman says the term was coined by Lim Kit Siang after noticing increased non-Malay support for the coalition.

Azzman Abdul Jamal
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Selangor Perikatan Nasional chairman Mohamed Azmin Ali says Lim Kit Siang uses the 'green wave' label to instil fear among non-Malays and counter PAS. Photo: Bernama
Selangor Perikatan Nasional chairman Mohamed Azmin Ali says Lim Kit Siang uses the 'green wave' label to instil fear among non-Malays and counter PAS. Photo: Bernama

The "green wave" term is a tactic and trap by DAP veteran Lim Kit Siang to create negative perceptions towards PAS, Selangor Perikatan Nasional (PN) chairman Mohamed Azmin Ali said today.

He likened it to a political game aimed at painting a picture of PAS taking over on the back of an image that painted the party as extremist.

"We are aware of Lim Kit Siang's tactic and trap to scare non-Malay voters by promoting the 'green wave' as an uprising of PAS, a party that has been accused of being racial and playing racist extremist politics," he said during a press conference at the Selangor PN Election Convention in Shah Alam.

Azmin, who is also Bukit Antarabangsa assemblyman, said this perception created by Lim emerged after realising increased support from non-Malays for PN.

He added that the presence of non-Malays at today's convention and the recent event held at Senawang in Negeri Sembilan clearly demonstrated strong support for PN.

Combined with the growing support from the Malays since the 15th general election, Azmin said this indicates that PN has a bright opportunity in the upcoming state polls in six states.

"This proves they have confidence in PN's ability to bring about change in the upcoming state elections," he added.

Meanwhile, Azmin said that PN will introduce several new faces consisting of young professionals in Selangor.

"That's what the people want, so we will fulfil it.

"PN will also field candidates from the Indian and Chinese communities," he added.

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