Saturday, February 27, 2021

Telegram reports 25 million new users in 3 days

Telegram has become a 'refuge' for those seeking a private and secure communications platform, says founder.

Other News

AmBank to pay RM2.83 billion settlement over 1MDB scandal

This is in addition to the RM53.7 million penalty imposed by Bank Negara Malaysia and paid by AmBank Group.

AmBank bayar Putrajaya RM2.83 bilion disebabkan penglibatan dalam skandal 1MDB

Pembayaran ini akan menguntungkan rakyat Malaysia kata Menteri Kewangan Tengku Zafrul Aziz.

Palm oil churns trouble in Canadian ‘hard butter’ puzzle

The pandemic has increased demand for butter, so farmers are feeding extra palm oil derivatives to their cows to produce more milk fat.

Kes Covid-19 kembali melebihi 2,000, 11 kematian baru

11 lagi kematian dicatatkan menjadikan jumlah 1,111 kes.

Daily cases back over 2,000, death toll up by 11

2,253 new cases, 3,085 recoveries.

The encrypted messaging app Telegram has registered 25 million new users in the past 72 hours, its Russia-born founder Pavel Durov said Tuesday, on the heels of WhatsApp announcing a change to its privacy terms.

Durov, 36, said on his Telegram channel that the app had over 500 million monthly active users in the first weeks of January and “25 million new users joined Telegram in the last 72 hours alone”.

The surge in downloads comes after WhatsApp, which boasts over two billion users, introduced controversial changes to its privacy conditions that will allow it to share more data with its parent company Facebook.

“People no longer want to exchange their privacy for free services,” Durov said without directly referring to the rival app.

WhatsApps’s new terms sparked criticism as users outside Europe who do not accept the new conditions before Feb 8 will be cut off from the messaging app.

Telegram is a popular social media platform in a number of countries, particularly in the former Soviet Union and Iran, and is used both for private communications and sharing information and news.

Durov on Tuesday said Telegram has become the “largest refuge” for those seeking a private and secure communications platform and assured new users that his team “takes this responsibility very seriously”.

Telegram was founded in 2013 by brothers Pavel and Nikolai Durov, who also founded Russia’s social media network VKontakte.

Telegram refuses to cooperate with authorities and handover encryption keys, which resulted in its ban in several countries, including Russia.

Last year, Russia announced that it will lift its ban on the messenger app after more than two years of unsuccessful attempts to block it.

WhatsApp meanwhile reassured users about privacy at the Facebook-owned messaging service.

There was “a lot of misinformation” about an update to terms of service regarding an option to use WhatsApp to message businesses, Facebook executive Adam Mosseri, who heads Instagram, said in a tweet.

“The policy update does not affect the privacy of your messages with friends or family in any way,” Mosseri said.

“We can’t see your private messages or hear your calls, and neither can Facebook,” WhatsApp said in a blog post.

“We don’t keep logs of who everyone is messaging or calling. We can’t see your shared location and neither can Facebook.”

Location data along with message contents is encrypted end-to-end, according to WhatsApp.

“We’re giving businesses the option to use secure hosting services from Facebook to manage WhatsApp chats with their customers, answer questions, and send helpful information like purchase receipts,” WhatsApp said in the post.

“Whether you communicate with a business by phone, email, or WhatsApp, it can see what you’re saying and may use that information for its own marketing purposes, which may include advertising on Facebook.”

Follow us on Telegram for the latest updates: https://t.me/malaysianow

Subscribe to our newsletter

To be updated with all the latest news and analyses.

Related Articles

Australia passes landmark law requiring tech firms to pay for news

The new law paves the way for Google and Facebook to invest tens of millions of dollars in local content deals, and could prove a model for resolving the firms' tussles with regulators worldwide.

YouTube to roll out parent-approved accounts for tweens

The move responds to concerns about violence and other inappropriate content which may be viewed by minors on the massive video-sharing platform.

SolarWinds hack required massive, sophisticated effort, says Microsoft head

Microsoft, one of more than 100 companies attacked and 18,000 left vulnerable by the hack, has analysed the work it took to insert malware into widely used security software created by SolarWinds.

Facebook to restore Aussie news pages as deal reached on media law

The compromise means that Facebook and Google – the main targets of the law – are unlikely to be penalised so long as they reach some deals with local media firms to pay for news.

Webs of deceit woven to entrap children

Teens are tech savvy but not mature enough to spot and deal with online sexual predators hunting them.